Keeping Fun in Computing

30-minute Talk - date TBD at time TBD in room TBD

In this talk, we'll explore how maintaining a sense of fun and whimsy in science has a profound effect on discovery, innovation and progress.

We'll discuss how you and I can keep computing fun on a day-to-day basis, maintain and nurture our natural curiosity, and just be open to the unknown, all to the benefit of our field, those we work with, and ourselves.

Alan Perlis, the first recipient of the Turing Award, said:

I think that it's extraordinarily important that we in computer science keep fun in computing. When it started out, it was an awful lot of fun. [Eventually] we began to feel as if we really were responsible for the successful, error-free perfect use of these machines. I don't think we are. I think we're responsible for stretching them, setting them off in new directions, and keeping fun in the house. I hope the field of computer science never loses its sense of fun.

In this talk, we'll explore how maintaining a sense of fun and whimsy in science has a profound effect on discovery, innovation and progress.

We'll see how some famous thinkers, including Claude Shannon, Steve Jobs, Einstein, DaVinci and more followed their natural curiosity to keep science fun, all to great success.

We'll also talk about some modern examples of how folks are ensuring technology remains not-so-serious, including the beauty of the lightning talk, the Stupid Hackathon, Deep Dream, the Clock of the Long Now, Simone Giertz's robots, and some examples specific to the Python community.

And finally, we'll discuss how you and I can keep computing fun on a day-to-day basis, maintain and nurture our natural curiosity, and just be open to the unknown, all to the benefit of our field, those we work with, and ourselves.

This talk is for any developer, but especially for those that programming either must be serious, or has lost it's fun.

After watching this talk, attendees should have new techniques for maintaining a sense of fun and whimsy when it comes to day-to-day programming, and our field in general.

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